Newsfeed

Teaching Entrepreneurship? Steps to Setting up a Partnership

Originally published on PBS by Amy Eisman and Lynne Perri President Obama’s visit earlier this month to 1776, the startup hub in downtown Washington, , shined a spotlight on entrepreneurship and innovative thinking nationwide. It was a good location because the contemporary, well-lit loft that incubates and supports area startups has grown from zero to 215 members in only a year-and-a-half. The president’s visit highlighted two entrepreneurial stories, not only of 1776 but also of the early steps by American University involving its Masters of Arts in Media Entrepreneurship program(MAME) and two campus collaborators. We became the hub’s first university partnership in a fruitful relationship that could be repeated at other campuses across the country. The partnership has benefited...
Read More ...
Newsfeed

Looking To Transform Your Business? There’s An App For That

Originally posted on Cox Blue by Laura Hall If you’ve been managing your small business for more than a few years, you may remember the old days before the Internet was ubiquitous and people had a half-dozen different gadgets for completing every daily task. It was a simpler time. People saved files locally on their own personal computers, they conducted business over landline phones, and they even got things done using – gasp! – pen and paper. It’s not the same anymore. Managing your business these days requires adapting to the changing technology landscape. If you’re willing to embrace the latest trends, you’ll find new levels of speed and productivity that allow you to accomplish more each day. And...
Read More ...
Newsfeed

The Most Important Skill for Great Leaders? Trustworthiness.

Originally posted on 99u by Heidi Grant Halvorson What makes a great leader? You are probably thinking it’s something buzzword-worthy like confidence.  Or maybe vision.  Or emotional intelligence—you hear about that one all the time.  For sure, those are all good qualities for a leader to have, but the answer is actually trustworthiness. Technically, it’s not just being trustworthy that is key, but being seen as trustworthy. The question “Can I trust you?” is always on our minds whenever we interact with other people (particularly when we meet them for the first time) though we usually aren’t consciously aware of asking it. Studies suggest that in order to figure out whether or not someone is trustworthy, we analyze their words...
Read More ...
Newsfeed

Why baby boomers are an important part of technology’s future

Originally posted on The Washington Post by Vivek Wadhwa Steve Jobs was 52 when he announced the iPhone. That was in 2007. Years later, the Apple co-founder introduced the MacBook Air, App Store and iPad. Tim Cook, who was 51 when he took over from Jobs, is building on his legacy. They both shattered a myth that the young rule the technology industry. Silicon Valley’s venture capitalists, however, speak openly of their bias toward the young. “People under 35 are the people who make change happen; people over 45 basically die in terms of new ideas,” Vinod Khosla, a prominent investor, said at a conference I attended. Referring to the age of entrepreneurs whom venture capitalists fund, investor Paul...
Read More ...
Newsfeed

Wharton Puts First-Year MBA Courses Online for Free

Originally posted on Business Week by Louis Lavelle Getting a Wharton MBA involves taking off from work for two years, moving to Philadelphia, and spending about $200,000 on tuition and expenses. Now, with the addition of three new courses on the online learning platform Coursera, you can get much of the course content for free. While you won’t get the full Wharton on-campus experience—or an internship, career services, or alumni network, for that matter—the new courses in financial accounting, marketing, and corporate finance duplicate much of what you would learn during your first year at the elite business school, says Don Huesman, managing director of the innovation group at Wharton. A fourth course in operations management that’s been offered...
Read More ...
Newsfeed

Top 10 Reasons Why Universities Need Entrepreneurs-in-Residence On Campus

Originally posted on Forbes by Ashoka Entrepreneurs-in-residence are successful businesspeople – and sometimes prominent members of the nonprofit world – who dedicate a specific amount of time doing research or pursuing other academic pursuits, primarily on campus or at locales associated with an academic institution. The entrepreneur-in-residence will often wear many hats at a university. These professionals may take on the role of in-class lecturer, mentor student startups on campus, serve as a coach to entrepreneurs, judge business plan competitions and serve on advisory boards. Some universities will have their entrepreneur-in-residence support community outreach initiatives by advising small business owners and working with local high school students on special projects. These talented men and women bring real-world expertise and entrepreneurial...
Read More ...